People with ADHD often beat themselves up because they think they don’t know how to prioritize. In this ADHD Support Talk Radio Podcast Episode Co-hosts Tara McGillicuddy and Lynne Edris   talk about the role that energy management plays in being productive and getting things done. Maybe its more about understanding and managing energy than it is about prioritizing.  Learn more about the connection between Prioritizing, Energy Management and ADHD in this episode.

People with ADHD (Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder) often struggle with prioritization and time management, which can lead to feelings of frustration and self-blame. However, in this episode of the ADHD Support Talk Radio Podcast, co-hosts Tara McGillicuddy and Lynne Edris explore the idea that energy management may be a crucial factor in being productive and accomplishing tasks for individuals with ADHD.

The traditional approach to productivity and time management often emphasizes the importance of prioritizing tasks. However, for people with ADHD, this approach may not always be effective because their struggles with attention and focus make it challenging to determine which tasks are most important or urgent. As a result, individuals with ADHD may find themselves overwhelmed and stuck in a cycle of self-criticism, feeling like they are constantly failing to prioritize correctly.

In this podcast episode, McGillicuddy and Edris suggest that understanding and managing energy levels could be a more beneficial approach for individuals with ADHD. Energy management involves recognizing when your energy levels are at their peak and using that time to tackle tasks that require focus and concentration. It also involves identifying periods of low energy and using them for more passive activities or self-care.

By focusing on energy management rather than traditional prioritization methods, individuals with ADHD can work with their natural energy rhythms and optimize their productivity. They can learn to identify when they feel most alert and focused, and utilize those times for tasks that require sustained attention. Similarly, they can recognize when their energy levels dip and engage in activities that are less mentally demanding.

Understanding the connection between energy management, prioritization, and ADHD can provide individuals with new strategies to enhance their productivity and reduce the self-blame often associated with their difficulties. By aligning tasks with their energy levels and working with their unique strengths and challenges, individuals with ADHD can improve their ability to get things done effectively.

Tara McGillicuddy is described by those who know her – clients, fellow leaders, and community – as dedicated to the deep, soulful energetic-level shifts required by life. Whether she’s helping to SEE your life more clearly, identify where you’re stuck, tuning into sacred energies OR she’s helping to build a practical life with tools, structure, physical help and precise action steps, she is committed to giving everything she knows to help you live your best life and to feel fulfilled by it.

Tara has been known and celebrated in the ADHD community for decades of practical and long-lasting shifts in tens of thousands in her communities. The creator of ADDClasses.com, The ADHD Awareness Expo and ADHD Support Talk Radio Tara is one of the longest-standing leaders in the field. Over the years she has also honed her natural skills as an empath. She now also combines the rare gift of sight and energetic knowing and her latest project is Empath Now a resource to help Empower Empaths.

Podcast Co-Host Lynne Edris is a Productivity & ADHD Coach who helps overwhelmed professionals from all over the world learn to accomplish what they intend and take control of their days with ease so that they can perform at the level of their abilities and have more time, more energy and more bandwidth for what matters most to them. Lynne is a woman, wife, and mom with ADHD herself, so she understands the struggles and challenges of living with ADHD. She has gone from living in the constant state of chaos, overwhelm, and under-performance that adults with ADHD know far too well, to living a life of more success and fulfillment than she once dreamed possible. Her passion is to help others fulfill their own potential and start “firing on all cylinders” in all areas of your life. You can learn more about Lynne at www.CoachingADDvantages.com, and text keyword “HACK” to 33777 to get her 7 Fool-Proof Productivity Hacks for overwhelmed professionals!

ADHD Support Talk Radio is an award winning Podcast for Adults with ADD / ADHD. Co-hosts Tara McGillicuddy and Lynne Edris are joined by Adult ADHD experts and they cover important topics related to Adult ADD / ADHD. Podcast guests include Dr. Edward Hallowell, Dr. Stephanie Sarkis, Dr. Ari Tuckman, Laurie Dupar, Terry Matlen and many more.

Tara McGillicuddy is the Producer, Owner and Co-host of the ADHD Support Talk Radio Podcast.

Lynne Edris is the Co-host of the ADHD Support Talk Radio Podcast.

    2 replies to "Breaking Free from the Prioritization Trap: Exploring the Energy-Productivity Connection in ADHD"

    • EM

      In my experience it’s both.

      Usually, at any given energy level, there are multiple tasks I can do. At any given moment, I have to pick one of them to work on. That’s where prioritization comes in. When I’m already tired from figuring out at what energy levels 20 different tasks can be done, the decision becomes hard to make.

      It’s especially tough when most of the tasks I really want or need to do require a higher mental energy level than I have!

      • admin

        Yes AND when you have a solid processes in place for task management and planning that work for you with your natural strengths and tendencies (including your natural flow of focus and energy), your “systems” or processes will ideally have a flow that helps eliminate many of those decisions for you. So, when it’s time to get into action, you haven’t spent so much valuable Executive Function bandwidth on deciding that you don’t have enough for the actual doing! It’s so key for those of us with ADHD!

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